CONTEST: Savour a sweet-tart home-grown harvest!

Share a favourite cranberry recipe for a chance to win a private harvest tour for four

What’s your favourite red berry? While some savour strawberries in June, and red raspberries are a summer delight, as the calendar turns to September, there’s no doubt the star of fall fields is the cranberry.

This unique harvest is typically the focal point of the annual Fort Langley Cranberry Festival – which was scheduled to welcome some 60,000 people for its 25th anniversary this year, before COVID-19 put a damper on the celebrations.

While this year’s festivities are on hold, one lucky winner of the Cranberries BC Culinary Contest will enjoy a private farm tour for up to four family members this fall! Click here for details and check out the hashtag #CranCulinaryBC!

“It’s a unique crop and people love to see how it’s grown and harvested. They’ll come out to spend a day at the farm and take photos with the flooded fields, surrounded by the berries,” says Jack DeWit, a longtime cranberry farmer and member of the BC Cranberry Marketing Commission.

A crop unlike any other

Cranberries are unique in a few ways. A successful season requires frost-free days before the early fall harvest, level land with appropriately acidic soil, and ample water for harvest, DeWit notes.

Why?

Unlike other berry crops, cranberries are harvested in water, with fields flooded and the cheery crimson berries beaten off the bush then gathered in booms.

Cranberry farming reaches back as far as the 1940s in BC, with crops growing with the demand. Today, approximately 65 farmers are harvesting the tasty berries in British Columbia, mostly concentrated in the Lower Mainland area, with a few growers on Vancouver Island.

About 95 per cent of berries harvested in BC will find their way to Ocean Spray, a farmer-owned cooperative, where they’ll be dried into sweet and delicious craisins, processed into juice or packaged for your grocery shelves to be used as a tart addition to muffins and scones, added to sweets or cooked into the perfect accompaniment to your holiday dinner!

Not only are cranberries a tasty addition to the kitchen, but ongoing studies continue to point to the berries’ powerful wellness-promoting phytochemicals that have been linked to prevention of certain infections and some age-related chronic diseases, for example.

“A lot of people enjoy using cranberries in their baking and for many people, craisins have replaced raisins as a favourite snack,” DeWit says.

“When I talk to the public and I say I grow cranberries, people often tell me how much they like the product.”

And while we eagerly await next year’s Fort Langley Cranberry Festival, you can enjoy BC cranberries any time of year! Visit bccranberries.com for an array of delicious recipes, family fun activities for kids and a wealth of nutrition resources.

AgricultureContestsFood & Dining

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Unlike other berry crops, cranberries are harvested in water, with fields flooded and the cheery crimson berries beaten off the bush then gathered in booms.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

(Kelowna Capital News)
B.C. Labour Board orders Peachland cannabis company to reinstate laid-off employees

The B.C. Labour Relations Board determined the employees were laid off due to their plan to unionize

File photo
EDITORIAL: The power of a single vote

In the Oct. 24 British Columbia election, every vote is important

RCMP stock photo (Black Press)
Kelowna RCMP investigating unexplained death of cattle

Cattle found dead near gravel road, east of the Kelowna Airport

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry presents modelling of COVID-19 spread in B.C., March 25, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 203 new cases

up to 1,766 active cases in B.C., two more deaths

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

More and more electric cars are on the road, but one Chevy Bolt owner was shocked to see how much his BC Hydro bill skyrocketed once he started charging the vehicle. (Black Press file photo)
Lower Mainland man sees significant spike in BC Hydro bill after buying electrical vehicle

An increase should be expected, but Brian Chwiendacz experienced a 200-plus per cent hike

The Anonymous YVR is an Instagram page that reviews restaurants and other establishments around B.C. based on how well they adhere to COVID-19 rules. (Instagram)
Anonymous Instagram page reviews COVID-19 safety measures at B.C. businesses

There are a number of public health orders various types of establishments must follow to slow virus’s spread

Penticton Fire Department chief Larry Watkinson advises against using fireworks on Halloween this year. (Jenna Cocullo / Black Press Media)
How to not get blown up or catch COVID-19 this Halloween in Penticton

Halloween amid a pandemic will present a handful of unique challenges

A portion of Pelmewash Parkway was closed briefly Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020, while Lake Country Fire Department and RCMP responded to rescue an eight-month-old puppy stuck on a cliff. (District of Lake Country - Facebook)
Police and firefighters save Lake Country puppy from cliff

A portion of Pelmewash Parkway was closed briefly Wednesday as fire, RCMP responded to rescue mission

The Sicamous Fire Department was able to use their ladder truck to rescue a cat which had been stuck in a tree. (Chelsea Bowman-Facebook)
Cat stuck in tree for two days saved by Shuswap firefighters

Rescue also an opportunity to train with ladder truck

Jordan Naterer, an electrical engineer from Vancouver, was last seen Saturday Oct. 10. (Facebook photo)
Search efforts to resume for missing Manning Park hiker; Trudeau speaks on case

PM says he’ll do what he can to ‘nudge’ efforts to find Jordan Naterer, yet has little leverage locally

Most Read