Agreement not good for Canada

The Canada-China FIPA (Foreign Investment and Protection Agreement) appears to protect only one player: China

Dear Editor:

Have you heard about the deal in Parliament? Most of you probably have not.

The deal is dubbed Canada-China FIPA (Foreign Investment and Protection Agreement) and so far as I understand, it appears to protect only one player: China.

If finalized this week, it will open doors to multi-billion dollar buyouts of Canada’s resources. A Globe and Mail writer has called the deal “tantamount to a commercial bill of rights for China in this country” and goes on to say “Nexen is important. But it’s a tree. The investment deal is the forest.”

If this deal goes through, Chinese companies will have the right to sue your municipality, province, and the federal government. FIPA could allow Chinese companies to challenge our laws, and sue our pants off if they don’t get their way.

The losers in this situation: employees, the environment, healthy communities, and of course, Canadian taxpayers.

This is a 31-year deal and there is no escape route for Canada if relations begin to falter.

This is not a good deal for Canadians.

The political agenda of the few running our country is scary to say the least.

The fact that the federal government is secretly selling Canada’s resources and rights to the Chinese is taking it to the limit.

As of Oct. 25, no debate had occurred. Without debate or vote, the deal could automatically be approved by Nov. 1.

Call MP Dan Albas and find out what’s happening.

As Canadians we must stand up to be heard, and stop ignoring the values we hold true before they crumble away.

Erin Carlson

Summerland

 

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