The cost of sport

Summerland racing driver Sarah Cornett-Ching will compete in the ARCA Racing season this year.

Summerland racing driver Sarah Cornett-Ching will compete in the ARCA Racing season this year.

The 23-year-old driver has been racing since she was 12, beginning at the Penticton Speedway. Her goal is to compete at the top level of Nascar, the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing.

There are 20 races on the ARCA circuit this year.

This prestigious agreement speaks highly of Cornett-Ching’s ability in auto racing. She has spent years learning the skills necessary to compete with some of the best race drivers.

Reaching this level has taken plenty of hard work, dedication and determination.

It has also taken plenty of money.

Two years ago, Cornett-Ching was given the opportunity to race in the prestigious Daytona 200 stock car race, but was not able to compete because of a lack of funding.

Since then, she has worked as a welder in order to raise money for her racing and earlier this year, she was able to compete on the Daytona track in Florida. In addition to her own efforts, she also set up an online donation campaign, with the goal of raising $16,000.

Cornett-Ching’s challenges are not unique to her sport. Other top-level Summerland competitors, including Olympic bobsleigh athlete Justin Kripps and former Olympic skier Kristi Richards have had similar stories.

Each of them have had to spend years in training, as well as efforts in promotions and fundraising efforts in order to reach their levels of competition.

Sport activities are seldom cheap and never easy, especially for those who are competing at the national or international levels.

Success stories such as Cornett-Ching’s recent contract are inspiring and encouraging, but it is important to remember they do not happen effortlessly.

The opportunity to compete at a high level is the culmination of years of preparation.