In 1911, Tommy Young rented this building in Summerland from Judge Wellington C. Kelley, for a Flour and Feed store. By 1912, he had purchased the building from Kelley and expanded his facilities. Today, this site is Summerland’s Municipal Hall parking lot. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

In 1911, Tommy Young rented this building in Summerland from Judge Wellington C. Kelley, for a Flour and Feed store. By 1912, he had purchased the building from Kelley and expanded his facilities. Today, this site is Summerland’s Municipal Hall parking lot. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

LETTER: Lasting memories from former Summerland pool hall

Building was a safe place for teens to gather

Dear Editor

If memory serves, this photograph brings back memories of the Summerland pool hall run by Shorty which was in full swing in at least the ’60s. There were six beautiful full-size Brunswick pool tables available for hire at ridiculously low rates and it was a safe teen age hangout.

READ ALSO: Young was a Summerland entrepreneur

READ ALSO: Historic 1907 building still a Summerland landmark

Shorty had a policy where girls played free and profanity was discouraged. We were allowed to crank up the jukebox really loud and Shorty would sometimes plug the machine with his own quarters. It’s where I first heard the tune, Shotgun, by Jr. Walker and the All Stars, really loud.

Those were good times. Exquisite and indelible memories. “Snick” went the cue ball. Oh no! “Scratch!” Like, shucks, oh dear! Darn it!

The fact that the pool hall was right across the street from the United Church I’m sure frustrated Dr. Wilcox in his position of finding young lads to take up the collection plate on Sunday morning.

Gordon Boothe

Summerland

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

historyLetter to the EditorSummerland