EDITORIAL: The purpose of a petition

More than 1,000 people opposed to a development proposal have signed a petition asking council not to approve the project.

More than 1,000 people opposed to the Banks Crescent development proposal have signed a petition asking council not to approve the project.

The petition includes signatures from around the community, not just from those living close to the proposed seniors care facility.

A petition of this magnitude is a useful tool to determine the degree of opposition to a proposal, and for this reason, it must be taken seriously.

Petitions such as this one show whether the direction of council is supported by the public, and when many sign a petition, it is time to take notice.

People in the community, and not just those living close to the proposed location, have concerns about this development.

There is a time to speak out, and since the iCasa proposal was made public in November, many have spoken out in opposition.

However, a petition by itself should not be the sole factor in determining whether the proposed development should be approved or rejected.

Instead, the question for members of council to ask is whether a proposal is good for Summerland.

Making such a decision requires careful consideration of the proposal and its potential effects on the entire community.

At times, elected officials will have to make the tough decisions decisions which may be unpopular at the time but which are ultimately the right choices to make.

It is too early to tell how council should decide on the Banks Crescent development. A recent open house and question and answer session have both showed there are still some important questions which must be addressed.

In the end, it will be the answers to these questions, not just the number of signatures on a petition, which should affect council’s decision.