EDITORIAL: Pageant transition

Expanding Summerland’s Blossom Pageant to include male and female candidates means important changes

In 1946, when Joan Downing (nee Nisbet) was named Miss Summerland, the contest was set up as a beauty pageant for young women.

That year there were six candidates, but no organized pageant program. Downing later recalled having to walk up and down Main Street in a bathing suit.

In 1969, the program changed from a beauty pageant into a well-organized developmental program for young women. Training now included public speaking and deportment — skills the young women could use for the rest of their lives.

READ ALSO: Summerland pageant to open to male candidates

READ ALSO: Royalty crowned at Summerland Blossom Pageant

And in the 1980s and 1990s, two Summerland pageant contestants later went on to become Miss Canada.

This year, the pageant is undergoing another change as the first male candidate is participating.

Opening the pageant to young men as well as young women is as significant a change as introducing an organized pageant program half a century ago, and the coming year will be a learning process for pageant organizers, contestants and the community as a whole.

With male and female contestants, the door is now open for male and female ambassadors, representing Summerland around the province.

This will also mean some structural changes to the program as well as changing some of the terms used.

The references to a queen and princesses will need to change in order to make the program more inclusive.

Out-of-town travel will also change, as the youth ambassadors will now require male and female chaperones and separate accommodations for male and female representatives.

While the changes are significant, including young men in the program is an important development.

The skills taught through the program are increasingly important for young people entering the work force.

Those who are able to speak publicly and those who are able to carry themselves well will be better equipped than those without this training.

— Black Press

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Rain in Sunday forecast for Okanagan-Shuswap

Environment Canada calling for 15-20 millimetres in regions

Arena served Summerland for 26 years

Warm winters meant short ice seasons in early 1950s

Severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Okanagan, Shuswap

Environment Canada is forecasting strong wind gusts, large hail and heavy downpours in parts of the Interior

WorkSafe BC conducted 70 inspections in the Okanagan amid B.C.’s reopening plan

WorkSafe BC has conducted 100 inspections at restaurants across the province since May 19

EDITORIAL: Revisiting alcohol consumption

A proposal to allow alcohol consumption in some public spaces in Penticton deserves consideration

Kelowna councillor creates campaign to help small businesses, charity

Made In YLW aims to support local businesses affected by COVID-19

Love flourishes at Peace Arch Park, but COVID-19 concerns loom

South Surrey park becomes only place for international couples to meet

UPDATE: B.C.’s Central Kootenay issues evacuation orders for hundreds of residents due to flooding

An evacuation alert covers all areas except the Cities of Castelgar and Nelson

PHOTOS: Thousands gather at Vancouver Art Gallery to protest racism

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Morning Start: How long did the Rodney King riots of 1992 last?

Your morning start for Monday, June 1, 2020

Number of students returning is a wild card as B.C. schools reopen Monday

A common model will see other teachers work four days a week in class then the fifth remotely,

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

Most Read