EDITORIAL: Clarifying water schedules

A scheduled water system maintenance project has resulted in some confusion within the community.

A scheduled water system maintenance project has resulted in some confusion within the community.

This weekend, crews will service Pressure Reducing Valve #10, part of the community’s water distribution system.

To service this valve, a 3.4-kilometre line must first be drained.

While the initial plan called for a three-day water shutoff, the municipality has now found a way to supply water to most of the community during this time.

However, this alternative water supply does not meet drinking water standards and as a result, a boil water notice has already been issued.

These changes have resulted in some of the confusion surrounding this water work.

And now, as the boil water notice is in effect, questions are still being raised.

Some are asking whether the water is safe for any purposes while others are wondering if they will be without water for a long period of time.

Because of the importance of our water supply, clear answers about the notice and the quality of our water are essential.

In this case, while the municipality has presented information, the effects of the servicing have changed since the work was first announced in fall.

The message has changed.

Initially, residents were told they would have no water for three days. Later, the community was told water would still be available.

The boil water notice was implemented on Monday and could remain in place as late as March 17. The notice means residents must be prepared to cope for much longer than the initial three-day period.

Any disruption to the water supply and any change to the quality of tap water is serious.

At the very least, it is an inconvenience and at worst, it can have a significant impact on those who are elderly or ill.

The best way to manage water issues is to provide clear, accurate communication for those who are affected.