A matter of compromise

Communities in B.C. must have a plan for future growth in place, but determining how and where that growth will occur can be difficult.

Communities in British Columbia are required to have a plan for future growth in place, but determining how and where that growth will occur can become a difficult and controversial issue.

In Summerland, the Official Community Plan designated all future growth for the Summerland Hills area, at the western edge of the municipality. In 2008, the plan seemed to have merit as a development proposal was in the works. When the plan failed, Summerland was left with an unworkable growth strategy.

For the last several years, the focus has been on increasing the density in the core of the community rather than continuing with the sprawl which has defined Summerland in the past.

This strategy also means some agricultural land near the town core would have to be removed and used for urban development, a plan opposed by some in the agricultural sector.

While the goal of preserving farmland is admirable, it does not make sense to continue with the present method where farms and urban lands are often adjacent to each other.

Too often, an urban resident does not understand that farming can be noisy and that it can involve the use of some harsh pesticides and sprays. Rural-urban conflicts are not good for any of those involved.

Sprawl developments are also difficult for a municipality to maintain as full services are required throughout the community. It is much cheaper to have the bulk of the population in one part of the community.

And it is much less intrusive on the commercial farmers if agricultural land use and urban land use are kept separate.

There are no perfect solutions to land use in Summerland, but with a spirit of compromise and negotiations — on all sides — it is possible to come up with a plan which can benefit all.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Summerland amends procedure for virtual council meetings, adding transparency

During COVID-19 pandemic, meetings have been held using online technology

Summerland to reopen playgrounds and recreational facilities

Some outdoor spaces will reopen on June 1, but arena and aquatic centre remain closed

Playgrounds to reopen across the Okanagan on June 1

After nearly two months closure, playgrounds are set to reopen

LETTER: Summerland solar project should be reviewed

Questions raised about feasibility of proposed power project

Long-time South Okanagan principal retires, another takes the helm

Jeff Redden will start as principal of Naramata Elementary School in August

Mission prison COVID-19 outbreak ends, 9 new cases in B.C.

New positive test at Port Coquitlam care home

Flood watch for Salmon River upgraded as high temperatures, rain forecast

Shuswap Emergency Program warns residents to prepare now for possible extreme flooding

Man who bound, murdered Vancouver Island teen still a risk to public: parole board

Kimberly Proctor’s killer is still ‘mismanaging emotions,’ has had ‘temper tantrums’

VIDEO: Humpback whales put on quite a show

The ‘playful’ pod lingered by a Campbell River tour operator’s boat for quite some time

RCMP request public’s help in locating missing Salmon Arm man

Ken Derkach is a familiar face to many, one of the city’s residents who is without a home

Booze on Kelowna beaches? Mayor says ‘not at the moment’

Mayor Colin Basran says alcohol in public spaces is not on council’s radar right now — but that could change

Getting hitched at historic B.C. gold rush town still on table during COVID-19 pandemic

Micro-weddings, online visits, offered at Barkerville Historic Town and Park

VIDEO: Police look for suspect seen tripping elderly woman in Burnaby

The elderly woman was walking near the SkyTrain station when she was randomly tripped

Drunk man on a dirt bike and prohibited drivers without insurance keep Shuswap RCMP busy

Other calls resulted in excessive speed tickets and the arrests of two prohibited drivers

Most Read