A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., Monday, May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., Monday, May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Transport agency asks for public input on air travel for people with disabilities

The agency said it was looking to remove further barriers to travel across provincial or national borders

Two separate federal agencies issued announcements Tuesday on life with a disability in Canada — one seeking greater input on hot-button issues and the other urging society at large to challenge its preconceptions.

Statements from the Canadian Transportation Agency and Statistics Canada differed in scope and content, but both touched on issues that disabled Canadians have long said lacked adequate attention.

The CTA announced it was launching the next phase of its consultations on accessibility issues, saying it was looking to remove further barriers to travel across provincial or national borders.

StatCan, meanwhile, issued a report suggesting Canadian society’s understanding of disability is at odds with the realities experienced by the majority of those identifying as disabled.

Both agencies noted that their announcements came on the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, a United Nations initiative that began on Dec. 3, 1992.

In its call for public submissions, the CTA identified a handful of specific and sometimes polarizing topics on which it is particularly keen to receive feedback.

Those include the possible expansion of a policy often known as “one person one fare,” a rule that waives fees for those travelling alongside specific types of wheelchair users under particular conditions.

The policy currently only applies to domestic travel aboard flights with Canada’s major airlines, but the CTA said it’s seeking feedback on the idea of expanding it to include international travel and the country’s smaller air carriers.

The agency also explicitly requested feedback on how — if at all — airlines should accommodate emotional support animals or service animals other than dogs. The public is also invited to weigh in on how to apply accessibility regulations to small transportation providers, with consultations open until Feb. 7, 2020.

VIDEO: Harbour Air gears up for launch of first fully-electric commercial seaplane

Shay Erlich, a hard-of-hearing, multiply disabled wheelchair user, said it’s high time for the “one person one fare” policy to be expanded.

The Toronto resident often travels with a business partner who also uses a wheelchair and is visually impaired, with the two acting as each other’s caregivers.

“We very frequently get challenged as each other’s support person,” Erlich said in a written interview. “People don’t expect that disabled people can be each other’s support person, and we frequently have to challenge the assumption that it is a way to scam the system.”

Erlich said the policy should be easier for disabled travellers to access, noting current rules require requests be made by phone — effectively shutting out those facing barriers to verbal communication.

Meanwhile in its report, titled “The Dynamics of Disability,” Statistics Canada focused on broader issues.

The report said that while most Canadians picture disabilities as static, stable conditions that do not change over time, the reality is very different for the majority of disabled Canadians. StatCan said 61 per cent of Canada’s 6.2 million disabled people over the age of 15 have a disability that fluctuates or evolves over time.

The report said societal attitudes and policies often do not reflect this fact.

“Simply the presence of an underlying health condition — in the absence of any other information — provides, at best, an incomplete picture of the actual experiences and challenges persons with disabilities may have in their day-to-day lives,” the report reads.

Constanza Farias, 27, said that lack of understanding affects all aspects of her life. Farias has been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a genetic connective tissue disorder.

She said a traditional conception of disability sets up standards and expectations that people with fluctuating disabilities are at times unable to meet.

School officials and prospective employers, for instance, may be inclined to question or withhold accommodations based on the fact that a person’s presentation or needs shift over time.

Those expectations spill over to other realms as well, she said, citing doctors who struggled for years to diagnose her variable symptoms, as well as social situations in which her inability to predict her condition on a given day left her facing greater exclusion.

“It permeates absolutely every area of your life,” Farias said. “You’re kind of stuck in trying to fit into these boxes. The dynamic of having a disability that’s invisible and not very well understood means that you’re too disabled for certain things, and for others not disabled enough.”

READ MORE: Canada home to 6.5 million people with one or more disability

Michelle McQuigge, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

People are shown at a COVID-19 vaccination site in Montreal, Sunday, April 18, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
211 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health over the weekend

Currently, there are 875 active cases of the virus in the region

A nurse prepares a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16. As of April 19, more than 230,000 doses have been administered across the Interior Health region. (Phil McLachlan/Black Press)
More than 230K doses of COVID-19 vaccine administered across Interior Health

A total of 220,216 first doses and 13,775 second doses have been given to residents across the B.C. Interior

The City of Penticton is beginning work to install gates at the 200 Block breezeway on Main Street. (Dustin Godfrey/Western News file)
Penticton breezeway closed while city installs ‘decorative’ gates

The gates, estimated to cost $20k, are being installed to prevent ‘unwanted activity’

Louise with another load of bottles for ALERT. This super volunteer helps ALERT in so many ways. (Submitted)
Meet Penticton super volunteer Louise Hivon

Louise spearheads ALERT’s recycling fundraising, collecting bottles from anyone, everywhere

Oliver
A couple more South Okanagan schools with COVID-19 exposures

Penticton Christian School adds more exposure days, Oliver Elementary new on the list

In this image from NASA, NASA’s experimental Mars helicopter Ingenuity lands on the surface of Mars Monday, April 19, 2021. The little 4-pound helicopter rose from the dusty red surface into the thin Martian air Monday, achieving the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. (NASA via AP)
VIDEO: NASA’s Mars helicopter takes flight, 1st for another planet

The $85 million helicopter demo was considered high risk, yet high reward

A strange odour at a West Kelowna apartment building prompted the evacuation of 150 residents on Sunday morning, April 18. (Aaron Hemens - Capital News)
‘Do not occupy’ order lifted, residents of West Kelowna apartment allowed to return home

The building was evacuated early Sunday morning due to a strange smell

Families of two of three workers killed in a train derailment near Field, B.C., in 2019 have filed lawsuits accusing Canadian Pacific of gross negligence. The derailment sent 99 grain cars and two locomotives off the tracks. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Families of workers killed in Field train derailment allege negligence in lawsuit

Lawsuits allege the workers weren’t provided a safe work environment

Vernon Search and Rescue’s helicopter team was asked to be on standby to rescue a missing hiker in Naramata. (Air Rescue One/VSAR photo)
Lost hiker rescued in Okanagan Mountain Park

COSAR, PENSAR, and VSAR worked together to rescue a hiker in Okanagan Mountain Park

Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges all the empty vials of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines that she has provided to customers at the Junction Chemist which is a independent pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto, on Monday, April 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Increased COVID-19 activity brings vaccine clinic to Enderby

Registration opens Tuesday, April 20 for May clinic for anyone over the age of 18

(New Westminster Police)
4 youth arrested after 30-person brawl in New Westminster leaves 1 seriously injured

Police are looking for witnesses who saw the incident take place

South Surrey’s Paul Cottrell, who works with the DFO, tows a grey whale out of Semiahmoo Bay Sunday. (Contributed photo)
Dead whale floating near White Rock towed to shore for necropsy

Animal has been dead since at least April 15

courts
Penticton man guilty of assaulting young boys

Bryan Lamb was found guilty of two counts of assault

Abandoned Rail Brewing Company, located at 1220 Davenport Ave. on the KVR trail, has applied to the City of Penticton for a manufacturing facility and lounge endorsement. The city will review the application in their April 20, 2021 council meeting. (City of Penticton photo)
A new brewery could be coming to the KVR trail in the South Okanagan

The patio would seat up to 113 just 10 feet from the trail

Most Read