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Summerland snow measurements below normal

Measurements were taken at Summerland Reservoir and Isintok Lake
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Vines at a Summerland vineyard were covered in snow in late January. At present, the snow measurements taken at Summerland Reservoir and Isintok Lake are below normal. (Summerland Review file photo)

The amount of snow at Summerland’s two measurement sites is still below normal levels.

The snow measurements, from stations at the Summerland Reservoir and Isintok Lake, were taken on Feb. 29.

At Summerland Reservoir, the snow depth was 630 millimetres, or the equivalent of 168 millimetres of water. This is 80 per cent of the historical water equivalent of 211 millimetres, based on 61 years of measurements.

READ ALSO: Summerland snow measurements near normal levels

READ ALSO: Summerland snow measurements above normal levels

At Isintok Lake, the snow depth was 630 millimetres, or the equivalent of 139 millimetres of water. This is 91 per cent of the historical average of 152 millimetres of water, based on 60 years of records.

While the snowpack levels were well below normal at the beginning of January, they were closer at the start of February. In January they were at 88 per cent of normal at Isintok Lake and 59 per cent of normal at the Summerland Reservoir.

Measurements at both sites are taken on or before the first of the month from January to May. Then, measurements are taken on the first and 15th of the month until the snow pack has melted.

The two sites are to the west of Summerland.

A year earlier, at the beginning of March, 2023, the snowpack measurements were considerably higher than the historical averages.

This year, snow levels have been lower than normal at Summerland sites. In addition, the snow levels have been below normal in much of the province, according to the BC River Forecast Centre. The most recent provincial figures, from Feb. 1, showed the province’s snow levels were 39 per cent lower than normal levels, leading to concerns about drought issues in the spring and summer. The Okanagan was 14 per cent below normal at that time.

The next provincial figures are expected to be released March 8.



John Arendt

About the Author: John Arendt

John Arendt has worked as a journalist for more than 30 years. He has a Bachelor of Applied Arts in Journalism degree from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute.
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