Six major off road equipment dealers will be represented at the trade show.

Princeton holds one of B.C.’s first ORV trade shows this weekend

Start your engines!

Princeton will welcome hundreds of visitors this weekend to the annual BC ATV conference, as well as the first-ever off road vehicle trade show.

“By all indications this will probably be one of the biggest [events] ATV BC has ever held,” said Ed Vermette, president of the Princeton ATV Club.

While attendance at the meet-and-greet conference is normally 120 delegates, Vermette anticipates between 150-200 off-road vehicle enthusiasts will register.

Clubs from as far away as Princeton George and Vancouver Island are sending representatives.

The trade show, which will be held at the Princeton Arena Friday and Saturday, has approximately 27 booths. Sx major dealers will be featured.

Response to the show, which Vermette believes is the first of its kind in the province, has been “unbelievable,” he said.

Vendors range from off road vehicle sellers, to after market companies, insurance companies and auto dealers.

The trade show is open to the public, and admission is by donation. All proceeds will go towards the local club’s mixed use trail initiatives, said Vermette.

The event will also raise money through raffles, and there will be door prizes drawn hourly.

The trade show is open Friday May 3 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

There has been strong community support for the show and the meeting, Vermette said.

“Everytime we ask people they are more than willing to help.”

There will be numerous speakers at the conference, which will be opened by MLA Linda Larsen and Princeton Mayor Spencer Coyne.

ATV BC has secured a permit from the municipality for a ride on the KVR through town, and to Coalmont and back.

“We’d just like to say a big thank you to the community for helping us to get this going,” said Vermette.

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Summerland once had Old English theme

Design guidelines were introduced in late 1980s

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Crews repair damaged lakefront walkway in Summerland

Flooding in 2017 and 2018 took toll on popular walking path

COVID-19 ‘not a death sentence’ says Penticton woman after seeing senior mother recover

Cancer, blindness, a fractured hip, dementia, and COVID-19 not enough to bring Betty Jukes down

After living with horrible pain for nearly a year, Coalmont woman anticipates surgery

A Coalmont woman is waiting anxiously for the phone to ring. Nienke… Continue reading

Trudeau to seek 10 days of paid sick leave for Canadian workers, says talks are ongoing

Paid sick leave is key to keeping COVID-19 spread under control, prime minister says

Truck thief runs out of gas in North Okanagan

Pickup stolen from Coldstream, found not far away

COVID-19: B.C. park reservations surge as campgrounds reopen

Keep trying, many sites not reservable, George Heyman says

Okanagan film society screening for scholarships

North Okanagan students pursuing creative arts can apply for $2,000 bursaries

B.C. residents can now reserve a provincial campsite for a stay starting June 1

Campsite reservations will only be available to British Columbians

Cullen commission into money laundering in British Columbia resumes today

Inquiry was called amid growing concern that illegal cash was helping fuel real estate, luxury car and gambling

Morning Start: How sleepy is the koala bear?

Your morning start for Monday, May 25, 2020

Bike shops busier than ever, but owners worry about stock supply issues

Uptick in cyclists brings new challenges for shops

RCMP facing ‘systemic sustainability challenges’ due to provincial policing role

Provinces, territories and municipalities pay anywhere from 70 to 90 per cent of the cost of the RCMP’s services

Most Read