The District of Lake Country wants residents to get engaged in the process of creating a new liquid waste management plan. To that end, a staff member wearing a poop emoji costume went for a around town to spread awareness Thursday, March 11, 2021. (Contributed)

The District of Lake Country wants residents to get engaged in the process of creating a new liquid waste management plan. To that end, a staff member wearing a poop emoji costume went for a around town to spread awareness Thursday, March 11, 2021. (Contributed)

Poop emoji spotted in Lake Country sparks talk of waste management

Input wanted in new wastewater plan as district’s sewer system nears max capacity

The District of Lake Country is throwing the rules of polite conversation to the wind, encouraging residents to talk and learn about what happens when they flush their toilets.

To express their interest in having the public weigh in on liquid waste management, public engagement specialist Ruth Sulentich was out on the streets wearing a poop emoji costume Thursday morning (March 11).

The costume appears to have had its desired effect; numerous residents posted photos and comments on social media of the emoji walking around town with a sign directing onlookers to the district’s website.

Stormwater, septic systems, sewer collection and liquid waste are all managed through Lake Country’s Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP), which was approved by the province in 1998. The district has spent the last decade working to update the plan, according to the district’s Let’s Talk information webpage on the subject.

With 3,500 properties on Lake Country’s sewer system, the district is nearing maximum capacity, meaning it will have to secure another option soon.

As ground discharge nears full capacity, the district is seeking approval from the ministry of environment for an alternative discharge option. The options that have been vetted will be presented to the community in the coming weeks.

A timeline of the District of Lake Country's Liquid Waste Management Plan. (Contributed)

“As Lake Country grows, we need to continue to implement good solutions to serve an expanding population, care for the environment and protect public health,” communications officer Karen Miller said.

Having launched the community engagement process on liquid waste management, the district will now work until April 1 to assemble a public advisory committee. Public input will be gathered until May, and a draft LWMP will be worked on over the summer.

The District invites residents to get involved by visiting the Let’s Talk — Lake Country webpage on liquid waste management. Once there, residents can watch the What Happens After You Flush video to explain the ins and outs of local wastewater treatment.

READ MORE: Lake Country utilities manager clarifies switch to Beaver Lake water

READ MORE: Vernon to direct reclaimed wastewater into Okanagan Lake


Brendan Shykora
Reporter, Vernon Morning Star
Email me at Brendan.Shykora@vernonmorningstar.com
Follow us: Facebook | Twitter

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