Restoration efforts in the Garnett Valley area will benefit many species of wildlife

Restoration efforts in the Garnett Valley area will benefit many species of wildlife

Groups working to protect and restore habitat

For the fourth year, the Summerland Sporstmen’s Association and others are working with the province to restore habitat in Garnett Valley.

For the fourth year, the Summerland Sporstmen’s Association and others are working with the province to protect and restore habitat in the Garnett Valley area.

The organizations are erecting fencing, posting signs and deactivating illegal trails in the area.

“Summerland Sportsmen’s Association is actively working with the province and other partners to enhance wildlife habitat in Garnett Valley and protect the past investments made possible by hunters and anglers for this area,” said Dave Carleton, president of the club.

Between the  cattle guard near Summerland and the Munro Forest Service Road near Peachland, Garnett Valley is primarily Crown land, with a few private properties.

The land is important for mule deer, white-tail deer and mountain goats, as well as for rare and at-risk wildlife species.

Garnett Valley is also popular with off-road vehicle uses.

Wildlife Act regulations now designate all routes including those that are open year-round, those open only from May 1 to Dec. 31 and some that are closed entirely.

Habitats in the valley are sensitive to human disturbance and are slow to recover.

Off-road vehicle use, unauthorized camping, firewood cutting, firearms target practice and skeet shooting are not acceptable uses of provincial conservation lands in Garnett Valley.

Under provincial legislation, penalties of up to $575 can be imposed. Individuals who cause significant damage to the environment can face penalties of up to $1 million or imprisonment under the Forest and Range Practices Act.

The public can report illegal activities to the RAPP line 1-877-952-7277 or cell #7277.