Regularly servicing your home’s heating system provides longevity and efficiency, says Britech’s David Howell. “We make sure your system is running as efficiently as possible.”

Home heating 101: What you need to know before the cold arrives

Now is the time to get your home heating system ready for winter

With fall’s arrival, you know the Okanagan’s first cold snap of the season won’t be far behind.

And that’s exactly why now is the time to have your furnace, heat pump and other mechanical systems serviced – before you turn them on and discover something has gone wrong.

“Coming into fall, having just finished the warm summer season, people really aren’t thinking about their furnace, but having a professional come see if everything is working properly and safely is essential,” explains David Howell, from the Okanagan’s Britech HVAC.

“It offers that peace of mind – you definitely don’t want it breaking down in the middle of Winter.”

That peace of mind also comes from knowing you’re working with a Fortis Trade Ally Network member – a business that not only meets stringent training requirements, but also the quality of service Fortis requires.

“We really are looking out for the homeowner,” Howell says, noting that calling earlier will also help avoid the rush that will come in the next month or so.

Preventive care brings comfort – and savings

Servicing your heating system can also save you significant money in the long run, Howell notes.

“It’s like servicing your car – if you never change the oil, your car is not going to work as efficiently as it could and it definitely won’t last as long as it should,” he says. “We make sure your system is running as efficiently as possible.”

As part of the annual inspection and cleaning, your technician will notice if parts are becoming worn, before that affects larger – and more expensive – system components.

When it comes to replacing the furnace itself, Britech technicians are also looking at the system as a whole, including ductwork. Furnaces need to breathe, and original ductwork is often very restrictive, not enabling the furnace to move the air as it should. By changing just the ductwork around the furnace, this can often be remedied.

“As professional contractors, we’re looking at all those areas – we’re not just doing the minimum. Clients often tell us, ‘Wow – what a difference! It didn’t just change the furnace, it changed the whole feel of the home.”

Great rebate opportunities

If your system is past its prime, now is also a great time to think about upgrading, and take advantage of significant rebates available, such as up to $1,000 on a new, high-efficiency gas furnace – typically 20 per cent of the cost of a new furnace, so definitely worthwhile.

“If your furnace is 10 to 15 years old, it’s only about 70 per cent efficient. A new system will be around 97 per cent efficient, for a considerable difference on your winter heating bills,” Howell says.

And for those with baseboard heating, an even larger rebate is available to upgrade to a ductless heat pump system.

Ready to learn more about getting your home’s heating system ready for winter? Visit britechhvac.com and stay up-to-date on Facebook.

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If it’s time for a new furnace, Britech can walk you through the various options available, in addition to the various rebates available.

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