The Giant’s Head School kindergarten classes were having fun shovelling topsoil into their garden boxes last Friday. The classes began a kinder-garden project last week with garden boxes donated and made by parents. The Summerland Parks and Recreation Department donated the soil. Art Knapps Plantland and store manager Carly Esson provided gardening tools and Grasslands Nursery gave vegetable seedlings and worms. Tina Martin

The Giant’s Head School kindergarten classes were having fun shovelling topsoil into their garden boxes last Friday. The classes began a kinder-garden project last week with garden boxes donated and made by parents. The Summerland Parks and Recreation Department donated the soil. Art Knapps Plantland and store manager Carly Esson provided gardening tools and Grasslands Nursery gave vegetable seedlings and worms. Tina Martin

Fair trade and youth activities highlighted

Saturday offers the chance to participate in the Summerland Fair Trade Fair and the Youth Activity Fair.

Saturday offers the chance to participate in the Summerland Fair Trade Fair and the Youth Activity Fair.

The two events will be held in the Summerland Memorial Park May 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

It is a day for all ages, with booths set up around the park featuring face painting, community clubs and local and fair trade vendors.

Musicians from Summerland and Penticton will also be performing on the main stage throughout the day.

The Summerland Fair Trade Fair highlights the importance of buying locally and fair trade and offers an opportunity for people to become more aware of the choices available to them. Saturday will feature local vendors such as Summerland Sweets, Backyard Beans, SSS Photography and Tayah Chuback Jewelry. Some of the fair trade vendors will include Oxfam, Camino, Ten Thousand Villages, Namasth, Tea Turtle, Green and Black’s and Social Conscience Fair Trade Sports Balls.

Organizer Alison Braid says fair trade is a movement that has recently begun to gain more and more momentum worldwide. Buying fair trade is a small and simple choice for most consumers, yet it means a world of difference to the producer. It ensures that the artisans and producers are given fair prices for their work and also guarantees a long-term, reliable business relationship between established companies and producers in third world countries. This is essential in the elimination of slavery and poverty in the developing world. Buying locally certifies a lower impact on the environment and promotes the sustainability of local businesses.

The Youth Activity Fair, which is happening at the same time as the Fair Trade Fair, is an opportunity for young people to learn about some of the clubs and activities available to them in Summerland.

Exhibitors include the Badminton Club, the Cadets, Bricks-4-Kidz and more.

In addition, the bird house building project started last year by Summerland Secondary students will be set up in the park where people can buy bird house making kits to build at home or right there in the park with the help of students.

More information is available from Braid at summerlandtradefair@gmail.com or call Jane Stead at 250-770-7650 to find out about the Youth Activity Fair.