photo:contributed

The Tea Party lives on

The Canadian rock band will come to Kelowna in Spring

One of the great rock’n’roll bands to come out of Canada doesn’t plan on slowing down anytime soon.

The Tea Party was founded in 1990 and received seven of their 13 JUNO Award nominations between 1994 and 1988. The band has stayed together longer than their idols, Led Zeppelin and The Beatles.

Their unmistakable guitar riffs infused with middle eastern, celtic and mediterranean music sets them apart from the rest. Their willingness to stand out from the rest offered rewards and now the band is revered internationally.

As their career has continued, they have grown in popularity internationally. Becoming well known and in-demand in Australia and the U.S.

In the beginning of their career lead singer, Jeff Martin was constantly compared to the likes of the Doors’ frontman, Jim Morrison but they have forged their own path and cemented their mark on rock history.

“We have always stayed true to who we are, never followed trends even when everyone was either doing the grunge thing or doing nothing,” said drummer, Jeff Burrows.

The band took a break in 2005 but couldn’t quit each other and reunited in 2011.

“When we fell out and we were the complete opposite of that time — that was Canada rock’s heyday. None of it really had to do with the grunge scene. We always stayed true to our roots and realized we have always been very eclectic and we never pigeonholed ourselves to one sound,” said Burrows. “It’s strange now… listening to these new bands (that now) all sound like (the) stuff (we were) doing 30 years ago … they are right on track and we are just doing what we do.”

RELATED: Shakey Graves brings his musical evolution to the Okanagan Valley

When The Tea Party kicks off the Black River Tour, Dec. 27 in Toronto it will have been the longest time they haven’t toured together since their six-year hiatus.

“2020 will be our 30th anniversary when a band turns 30 years-old you really don’t have that perspective until say it out loud. Look at when Zeppelin started that they were done in 1980 and it’s crazy to look at things like The Beatles, did they play for 30 years? Nowhere near. So when you look at it that way to be appreciated on a national level like we are it’s an honour and we carry that weight knowing that we are very grateful for everything afforded us and keeps us going,” said Burrows.

The drummer says that their success stems from their inability to conform to trends, allowing them to be a band that almost 30 years later isn’t touring their hits but is still touring with new albums along with a few fan favourites thrown into the line-up.

RELATED: The Arkells bring Rally Cry to Kelowna

It was when the band played with the Sydney Youth Orchestra in Australia that Burrows had chills running down his spine. They performed Requiem, a song dedicated to their manager Steve Hoffman who died of cancer with the symphony and an opera singer wove her voice through the song to a full house in 2017.

“It was mind boggling, it’s something I am most grateful for, it’s those opportunities that you look around and say I don’t belong here. It’s unreal,” said Burrows.

The eclectic hard rock band will be stopping in Kelowna May 7 at the Kelowna Community Theatre. Tickets are available at selectyourtickets.com

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@sydneyrmorton
sydney.morton@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Roots and Blues online festival live tonight on Black Press Media

Tune in to Black Press Media to watch the festival live Aug. 14, 15 and 16

Okanagan COVID-19 case count growth slows

BCCDC data shows a stark contrast between Okanagan-specific numbers released in July and August

Okanagan Correctional Centre outbreak due to training session: Interior Health

Interior Health said in a statement the staff members were at an off-site training session

Morning Start: A Texas law allows astronauts to vote from space

Your morning start for Friday, August 14, 2020

Piano set up in Penticton downtown

Initiative an effort to bring music and creativity to the streets

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

Captain Horvat’s OT marker lifts Canucks to 4-3 win over Blues

Vancouver takes 2-0 lead in best-of-7 NHL playoff series with St. Louis

Vernon pedestrian struck dies from injuries

Emergency responders are on scene on Main Street near the CIBC, traffic affected

UPDATE: Fire in Lake Country a “smoke chase”

A water bomber reportedly took off from Penticton and is on the way to Lake Country

Kelowna man convicted of not paying taxes after turbulent trial

Man claims he doesn’t meet the definition of a ‘person’ under the federal Income Tax Act

Accused in Kelowna’s 2018 Canada Day killing granted bail more than 1.5 years later

Esa Carriere was stabbed to death during the Canada Day fireworks in downtown Kelowna in 2018

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Most Read