Irwin Wislesky’s ‘Invisible Footprints In Time?’ is expected to hit the shelves as early as Feb. 1. (Contributed)

Kelowna author Irwin Wislesky to release science-fiction novel on time travel

‘Invisible Footprints in Time?’ follows Maxine Samuels and her quest back in time to save the future

A Kelowna author has written his first novel, ‘Invisible Footprints In Time?’, a science fiction story of time travel, slated to be published next month.

Written by Irwin Wislesky, the story follows the fictional character Maxine Samuels, a research scientist who is driven to answer a single burning question: why has humanity’s spiritual connection to a higher power practically disappeared?

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Maxine wonders what will happen if this connection can’t be restored. As she examines her world for an answer, she realizes that power, fear, greed, corruption and shame have been used throughout history to control people and to prevent them from connecting to the oneness of the world.

She is certain that the keys to the future lie in the past as she engineers a means to time travel by combining modern science with spirituality and then travels back to places where humanity lost its way.

“I’ve always been interested in the idea of time travel,” said Wislesky.

“As a professional engineer with a strong math and science background, I’ve traveled extensively around the world, which has given me an opportunity to observe the differences and similarities between various cultures and people, particularly in the area of spirituality.”

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Wislesky garnered the idea for his novel on a business trip, flying to Peru. On the flight, he experienced some ‘interesting thoughts’ that he couldn’t help but scribble down on the back of his plane ticket. These thoughts grew over the next few weeks, followed by almost daily work on what was developing into a novel manuscript.

“During the process, I discovered a passion for writing that I didn’t know I had – to the point where I began to wonder if Maxine, the book’s main character, had actually traveled back in time to help me write it,” said Wislesky.

Self-published through FriesenPress and distributed by Ingram, ‘Invisible Footprints in Time?’ is expected to hit the shelves everywhere as early as Feb. 1.

The novel will be available in hardcover, softcover and ebook editions.

For more information on Wislesky and his debut novel, visit irwinwislesky.com.

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