Monica Chai, Janell Thorpe and Janna McNeely from medical imaging at VJH are grateful for the new diagnostic camera. (VJH Foundation photo)

Monica Chai, Janell Thorpe and Janna McNeely from medical imaging at VJH are grateful for the new diagnostic camera. (VJH Foundation photo)

New diagnostic camera replaces old equipment at Okanagan hospital

Cutting-edge addition to medical imaging department thanks to legacy gift

Much to the excitement of the medical imaging department, a unique tool for diagnosing and treating patients has now been installed in nuclear medicine at Vernon Jubilee Hospital. A new gamma camera, a GE NM 830 system, has replaced the 20-year old camera and the department is now boasting the most up-to-date and newest technology.

Dr. Curtis Mohamed, Medical Director of Nuclear Medicine explains: “The new camera comes with more sophisticated and updated technology for more accurate and comprehensive diagnosis and patient management. And because disease begins with microscopic cell changes, our team has the potential to identify disease in an earlier, more treatable stage.”

In conventional diagnostic imaging, an external source of energy such as X-rays, magnetic fields or ultrasound waves are used to produce primarily structural pictures. However, in nuclear medicine procedures, the energy source is introduced into the body in the form of a radioactive tracer. This tracer then accumulates in a specific tissue, organ or process and is then detected by a gamma camera to provide information on organ function and cellular activity.

The purchase was made possible thanks to a legacy gift.

“Legacy gifts often have great impact. A generous member of our community left a bequest in support of high priority needs in medical imaging. That generous gift enabled us to support minor renovations and the purchase of this critical diagnostic tool for our hospital” stated Kate McBrearty, VJH Foundation Executive Director.

Janell Thorpe, Professional Practice Leader and Radiation Safety Officer in the VJH Nuclear Medicine Department added: “The nuclear medicine team provides a wide variety of diagnostic exams across various departments. This advanced gamma camera provides better overall service to our patients as it enables us to use the latest technology to see with greater resolution how the body is functioning. It also has a more comfortable scanning bed and faster scanning times for some exams.”

“Many of the people that will be scanned will be cancer patients,” continued Thorpe. “Newly diagnosed patients visit the Nuclear Medicine department early in their diagnosis to have a pre-surgical scan done to detect lymph nodes. Follow-up exams will then occur every 2-3 months throughout their treatment in the first year of their diagnosis. The nuclear medicine scans will help determine the spread of disease, the effectiveness of the treatment, and will monitor any side effects chemotherapy drugs may be having on the heart.”

“Our team often forms strong bonds with these patients. We meet them in the initial stages of diagnosis and follow them throughout their treatment journey to recovery, cheering them on from the sidelines. We could not be more thrilled to have this new technology available to us.”

The gamma camera was installed early last month and has been operational at VJH since March 17.

READ MORE: Love shared with Vernon healthcare heroes via white hearts

READ MORE: Interior Health records second COVID-19 death


@VernonNews
newsroom@vernonmorningstar.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

HealthcareHospitalsTechnology

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

FILE - In this April 19, 2021, file photo, Keidy Ventura, 17, receives her first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in West New York, N.J. States across the country are dramatically scaling back their COVID-19 vaccine orders as interest in the shots wanes, putting the goal of herd immunity further out of reach. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
5 more deaths, 131 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health over the weekend

Those 18-years and older in high-transmission neighbourhoods can register for the vaccine

Danny Fulton receives his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at the Coast Capri Hotel on April 27. The pop-up clinic was hosted by the First Nations Health Authority. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
All adults in Rutland, Summerland now eligible to receive COVID-19 vaccine

Province expands age range to 18+ for vaccinations in ‘high transmission’ areas

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
Penticton RCMP search for 2 suspicious men

Police searching the area of Arawana Forest Service Road

Penticton Lions are hoping to send kids and adults with disabilities to Camp Winfield through a 50/50 raffle draw on now. (Submitted)
Penticton’s Lion’s Club helps to send kids to Camp Winfield

Online 50/50 raffle tickets will send kids and adults with disabilities to Camp Winfield

A bullet hole is seen in the windshield of an RCMP vehicle approximately 4 km from Vancouver International Airport after a one person was killed during a shooting outside the international departures terminal at the airport, in Richmond, B.C., Sunday, May 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Homicide team IDs man in fatal YVR shooting as police grapple with spate of gang violence

Man, 20, charged in separate fatal shooting Burnaby over the weekend

The southern mountain caribou, an iconic species for the Splatsin First Nation, is threatened with extinction, much to the dismay of the First Nation. (Province of B.C. photo)
Okanagan First Nation band concerned over dwindling caribou herd

Southern mountain caribou at risk of extinction, much to dismay of Splatsin First Nation near Enderby

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan/Capital News)
UPDATE: Winfield road open following police, coroner investigation

Pelmewash Parkway closure near Highway 97 connection

Kelowna resident Sally Wallick helped rescue a kayaker in distress a week and a half ago. (Sally Wallick/Contributed)
VIDEO: Kelowna woman rescues capsized kayaker in Okanagan Lake

Sally Wallick is asking people to be prepared for the cold water and unpredictable winds

The B.C. legislature went from 85 seats to 87 before the 2017 election, causing a reorganization with curved rows and new desks squeezed in at the back. The next electoral boundary review could see another six seats added. (Black Press files)
B.C. election law could add six seats, remove rural protection

North, Kootenays could lose seats as cities gain more

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the shooting of an Indigenous woman in the Ucluelet First Nation community of Hitacu. (Black Press Media file photo)
B.C. First Nation wants ‘massive change’ after its 3rd police shooting in less than a year

Nuu-chah-nulth woman recovering from gunshot wounds in weekend incident near Ucluelet

RCMP (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
High-risk takedown on Highway 1 following Shuswap shooting

Upon further investigation, the vehicle and its occupants were not associated with the shooting

Nurse Gurinder Rai, left, administers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to Maria Yule at a Fraser Health drive-thru vaccination site, in Coquitlam, B.C., on Wednesday, May 5, 2021. The site is open for vaccinations 11 hours per day to those who have pre-booked an appointment. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
COVID vaccine bookings to open for adults 40+, or 18+ in hotspots, across B.C.

Only people who have registered will get their alert to book

Most Read