Lynn Greene

Song addresses trangender rights

A music video is taking aim at discriminatory policies against transgender rights.

A music video created in collaboration with Penticton and Summerland artists is taking aim at discriminatory policies against transgender rights.

The idea was sparked by Penticton artist Lynn Greene when North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory signed into law the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act, a bathroom bill that applies to students at North Carolina state schools.

“I was so angry about the way people are treated about the bathroom issue. I think it’s stupid. Everybody needs a bathroom,” Greene said. “Let people have comfort and support them. It’s simple. We’re supposed to be people working together to make the world better not worse.”

She was inspired to write Citizen X The Bathroom Song.

“It started coming out one night, just middle of the night writing and that’s when The Bathroom Song came out,” Greene said.

She continued writing other songs that will be featured on the upcoming Citizen X album.

Greene is not a musician, she admits she can barely play a ukulele, but she was connected to Thurein Myint, music producer and owner of Ellis Avenue Studio in Penticton.

“We were impressed with who he is (Myint), and we started talking about two songs and it just kind of snowballed,” Greene said.

A working relationship began with Greene discussing her ideas for the songs, and collaborating back and forth with Myint, who in turn brings in musicians to realize her ideas.

“Interesting is the biggest thing I could say (about the music-making process), because it’s never quite what I expect, but that’s what collaboration is all about,” Greene said. “If I was dictatorial about it, it wouldn’t work.”

The idea eventually blossomed into a fully-fledged music video shot in Penticton at the Decoy Tavern, around Summerland streets and more locales around the area.

Chris Wallace, who stars in the The Bathroom Song video self-funded by Greene and her husband John, who are both executive producers on the video.

Wallace takes on the role of a transgendered woman, or Citizen  X. He became involved through a mutual connection to the video’s creative director and local photographer Stephanie Seaton.

“It was a really good experience. I consider myself a very strong ally to the LGBTQ community and it’s an issue that needs addressing. It’s ludicrous that people can’t use the washroom of their identified gender expression,” Wallace said. “I felt really empowered in the role helping shed light on the issue and coming together in solidarity.”

Wallace, also an musician and model, performs vocals for the song as well.

The Citizen X album is currently being pressed and a release party is being planned for the near future.

For more information on Citizen X visit www.citizenxbs.com.