In the early 19th century there was no border control in the South Okanagan region

Early South Okanagan border security

In the early 19th century there was no border control in the South Okanagan region.

In the early 19th century there was no border control in the South Okanagan region.

Through the Treaty of 1818, both the United States and Great Britain exercised joint occupancy and the right of entry into the area — until 1846, when the Canadian-American boundary was determined through the Oregon Treaty process.

Thereafter, border control became preoccupied with the numerous smuggling routes that sprung up after the creation of the International Boundary.

Such routes are still in use today, particularly in relation to Mexican cartels. This photo shows the International Boundary marker at Osoyoos in 1927.

Interested in learning more about contemporary border control in the South Okanagan region? Please join us for the first session of the Summerland Museum’s 2016 Lecture Series for an engaging and thought-provoking talk on South Okanagan border security.

The forthcoming 30 minute lecture takes place on Oct. 22 at1:30 p.m. (in our newly renovated exhibit room) and is based on recent graduate thesis research conducted by curator Amy McCroy.