Tune Agers offer musical opportunity

If you enjoy singing, come and join us, with a special invitation to the bass, tenor and baritone voices.

Dear Editor:

If you  are driving between Summerland and Penticton Tuesday mornings, between 8:30 and 9 a.m., you may see a white haired lady in a Mercury Grand Marquis, and if she has her mouth open.

It is not a prolonged yawn, she is not sleepy and it is not distracted driving.

She is simply doing her voice warm up exercises before arriving at the Penticton Tune Agers choir practice.

If you enjoy singing, come and join us, with a special invitation to the bass, tenor and baritone voices.

Group singing is the most exhilarating and transformative of all activities.

It takes a sound that begins inside you, shares it with a roomful of people and it comes back as something even more thrilling: harmony.

Both male and female voices, raised in song together, are required to create the beautiful harmony of a choir.

Besides the enjoyment, camaraderie and laughter, there is strong evidence that singing is one of our most healthy activities.

“Regular exercising of the vocal cords can even prolong life,” according to research by vocal coach and singer Helen Astrid.

“When you sing you automatically breathe deeper and the increased oxygen affects all parts of your body — not only your lungs and heart, but also your brain.  Plus, your body produces feel good hormones called endorphins. It’s exactly the same when you eat a bar of chocolate. The good news with singing is that you don’t gain any calories.”

Group singing is cheaper than therapy, healthier than drinking, and certainly more fun than working out.

It is the one thing in life where feeling better is pretty much guaranteed.

For more information contact: Gordon Dawson at 250-492-9844, Annabelle Redman at 250-492-6662 or Peggy at 250-487-1413.

Loretta Krauter

Summerland