Seeking signs

Unlike other communities in the Okanagan Valley, Summerland’s business and lakefront areas are not built up along Highway 97.

Summerland has a lot to offer, for those who know where to look.

Unlike other communities in the Okanagan Valley, Summerland’s business and lakefront areas are not built up along Highway 97.

As a result, the atmosphere and pace in downtown Summerland are more relaxed than in communities where the highway is also the main street.

The drawback comes when visitors to the region do not turn off the highway to discover all the community has to offer.

A decision at the last municipal council meeting to set up directional information signs along the highway is a good way to remedy the situation and announce upcoming local festivals and events at the same time.

There are some obstacles to overcome, including negotiating with the provincial Ministry of Highways on the design of the signs.

Electronic signs, which have been considered in the past, are no longer allowed under Ministry of Highways regulations.

If electronic signs are not used to update messages about coming events in Summerland, another method is needed.

A more significant obstacle will be simply getting the job done.

This is the third consecutive year municipal council has discussed directional signs on the highway, but the signs have not yet been constructed.

The need now is greater than ever.

Businesses depend on tourism dollars, but the tourists will not stop here unless they realize there is more to the community than what they can see from the highway.

Unless travellers know there are attractions in town, they will not stop here.

The work needs to be started soon, but one also wonders if this project will simply end up delayed once again.