Plan shows short-sighted vision

I worry about the legacy and opportunity I am leaving my grandchildren. We have had a divided community and it seems to be getting worse.

Dear Editor:

Another restless, sleepless night. I worry about the town I grew up in.

I worry about the legacy and opportunity I am leaving my grandchildren. We have had a divided community for the last decade and it seems to be getting worse.

We live in a harsh, cynical, violent and materialistic world that shuns love and truth.

I was lucky to grow up in an orchard, and from an early age, learned about the balance of nature.

Yes, I did leave it to seek my fortune for a high paying job but returned to what I now know is my passion.

I love growing food and sharing it with people. I love to see my grandson’s eyes light up when we go out to the orchard and gardens.

He prefers to eat fruits and vegetables from Grampa’s place because they taste better.

He understands the patience and balance required to grow his own food.

When I sit on the outside and observe the direction we are going in Summerland, I sense a short sighted vision of personal greed.

As we become more urbanized, we lose sight of the basics of life and the connection to what is real.

The City of Vancouver is trying to counteract their own destructive nature of urbanization by encouraging community gardens on vacant properties, allowing the owners to waive their property taxes.

Rooftops in the future will need to be “green.”

Nature has provided us all with flat arable land that is best suited for our own food requirements —not simply a cheap spot to put homes on.

Compromise is required to solve these issues — but the compromise needs to be in our minds — not the environment.

We are all spokes in the wheel of life. Every time a spoke is broken, the ability of that wheel to keep going around diminishes. I don’t want to be part of that broken wheel.

Ten minutes to downtown. I don’t get it. I have people drive out to Matsu Drive where I live, and get out to go for a walk in an atmosphere of orchards, vineyards, and Ponderosa Pines. Why do they do that?

I urge all members of my town to look at their own lifestyles and discard the excess of their lives and pursue their passions.

Warren Buffet, Bill Gates and many other wealthy people have made a pledge to the world to reverse their pursuit of money by embracing the needs of the less fortunate and donating their fortunes.

To those that presently own farmland and do not see the value in it, please move on and let others develop it into something our children will be proud of.

Moving our food production capabilities into marginal lands will not work for our future needs.

Gord Shandler

Summerland