Marijuana growing regulations needed

I applauded the idea that from April 1, 2014, the growing of marijuana was only to be allowed by licensed commercial grow operators.

Dear Editor:

I applauded the idea that from April 1, 2014, the growing of marijuana was only to be allowed by licensed commercial grow operators.

I envisioned the location would not be in residential areas, rural and agricultural because the very nature of this business entails a high security fence.

The business I expected would be in an industrial area where the whole establishment would be monitored.

If it was in  an industrial area, our municipalities would ensure fire codes, building codes, health and safety and security regulations were enforced.

Surprise, surprise. None of the above.

Many of these licensed commercial grow operations are hiding behind the Agricultural Land Reserve umbrella.

They are building huge manufacturing workshops on ALR land described for planning purposes as agricultural use.

This is not entirely true.

The ALR land is not being used and in some instances it is prime land.

Furthermore, Health Canada has decreed that even if you are a neighbour to one of these licensed grow ops, you have no right to be informed of such a risky business being conducted in your area.

It seems outrageous that I do not have the choice to protect my family from a substance which very often attracts serious organized crime.

Councils across B.C. are in a quandary. They do not know how to handle this new legislation.

Point in fact, Kelowna council is trying to make a decision. Council fighting the government is going to entail the taxpayer in a lot of money.

A far simpler alternative would be four councils to make a special bylaw for pot manufacturing.

The manufacturing, distribution, etc. would only be done in a secured location on designated legal industrial lands.

In so doing, the general public would be assured that there is no danger to them.

L. Price

Summerland