A time to remember

On Tuesday morning, Summerlanders will gather at the cenotaph in Memorial Park to observe Remembrance Day.

On Tuesday morning, Summerlanders will gather at the cenotaph in Memorial Park to observe Remembrance Day.

The 11 a.m. ceremony is a time to remember those who died while in military service and to reflect on the effects of war on those who served, those in affected areas and on the families and friends of those who died or were injured.

During World War I, 628,736 Canadians served. Of these, 66,573 died in action and 138,116 were wounded.

In World War II, 1,031,902 men and 49,963 women served. There were 44,927 Canadians who died in action and 53,145 who were wounded.

Canada has also has a presence in Korea, peacekeeping operations, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Summerland’s cenotaph has the names of 36 men and one woman who died in World War I and 24 men who died in World War II.

It is important to remember those who served and those who died as a result of war. It is equally important to take steps to avoid similar conflicts from arising in the future.

These steps include learning to resolve small disputes quickly and amicably and learning to keep disagreements from turning into hostilities.

These are steps for all to take, not just for those in positions of power or leadership, and they are measures which must be remembered throughout the year.

A look at history, even during the past century, will yield examples where unresolved disputes have escalated into destructive and tragic wars.

Any measures which can help to prevent further conflicts from arising need to be examined.