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UPDATED: Council receives rezoning petition

Karen and Bob Walker have been canvassing and campaigning in opposition to the proposed Banks Crescent development. The Walkers walk twice a day, each day, with their dogs Duke and Austin. Bob Walker carries a large placard on his back, announcing his disapproval with the proposed development.  - Photo submitted
Karen and Bob Walker have been canvassing and campaigning in opposition to the proposed Banks Crescent development. The Walkers walk twice a day, each day, with their dogs Duke and Austin. Bob Walker carries a large placard on his back, announcing his disapproval with the proposed development.
— image credit: Photo submitted

A petition with more than 900 names opposed to the Banks Crescent development proposal has been received by municipal council.

The petition, organized by Summerlanders for Sensible Development, was started after the Nov. 14 municipal council meeting.

It included a written document and an online component.

Jos Dronkers, who presented the petition following a public question and answer session in January, said 962 signatures were collected.

“Important is that those people that oppose this development come from all over Summerland and not just Lowertown,” she said in a letter to council. “Although the proposed development will have a profound impact on the character of Lowertown, we strongly believe, as you know, that the development also has a profound impact on all of Summerland and beyond.”

Jeremy Denegar, director of corporate services for the municipality, said the written part of the petition meets the requirements of the Community Charter and provincial government standards, but the online petition, found at sensiblesummerland.com, does not meet these standards.

“Standard practice is not to publish online petitions,” Denegar said in a memo. “This is due to the inability of a government to reasonably verify the validity of the names on any online petition that is under the care and control of a third party.”

The online petition had a total of 208 signatures, but 29 were anonymous. Of the remaining 179, 94 were from Summerlanders and 85 were from outside the community.

The written petition, with 742 names in total, had 597 with Summerland addresses, 139 with addresses outside the community and six with addresses not provided.

The petition has now topped 1,100 names.

Earlier this month, the latest statistics were presented to municipal council, with a total of 1,141 signatures.

Of these, 880 are on hard copy and 261 have come in on an online petition. The online petition can be viewed at sensiblesummerland.com

While the written petition meets the requirements of the Community Charter and the provincial government standards, the online petition did not meet those standards, said Jeremy Denegar, director of corporate services for the municipality.

He said municipal staff cannot verify if the names in the online petition are valid.

 

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