Hearing loss a prevalent disability

The Quest Society of Summerland wants you to know that hearing loss is the third most prevalent chronic disability among older adults.

The Quest Society of Summerland wants you to know that hearing loss is the third most prevalent chronic disability among older adults.

Hearing loss occurs in as many in three in 1,000 live births each year.

Exposure to loud noise can lead to irreversible hearing loss.

The loss can occur gradually or within a short period of time.

Today headphones and earplugs with portable music players are the most serious source of loud music.

How do you prevent this noise-induced hearing loss?

Avoid or limit exposure to loud noise.

Protect your hearing. Earplugs or ear muffs can reduce noise by 15 to 30 decibels if worn properly.

Keep volume down. Aim for half the volume for the device.

Limit listening times, giving your ears some quiet time.

Noise is characterized by intensity, measured in decibels (dB.) Pitch is measured in hertz or kilohertz (Hz or kHz) and duration.

Loud noise at 149 dB can cause pain and even brief exposure can cause injuries.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration puts a limit for noise without hearing protection at 85 dB over an eight-hour period.

Hearing loss usually develops over a period of several years.

Because it is painless and gradual, you might not notice it or you might notice a ringing or other sound, such as tinnitus. This is the result of age-related hearing loss or long-term exposure to noise that has damaged hearing nerves.

Or you may have trouble understanding what people say. They seem to be mumbling, especially when you are in a noisy place such as a crowd or party.

This could be the beginning of high-frequency hearing loss. A hearing test will detect it.

The hearing problem may be caused by impacted wax or an ear infection, both of which are easy to correct. However, you may suffer from noise-induced hearing loss.

Everyone, it seems, has family and friends with hearing loss.

It is important to remember that empathy for many is less important than an understanding of their difficulties and an unwillingness by everyone to be discrete with them.

 

Sound levels

The faintest sound heard by the human ear 0 dB

A whisper or a quiet library 30 dB

A normal conversation or a sewing machine 60 dB

A lawn mower, shop tools, truck traffic 85 dB

A chainsaw, pneumatic drill, snowmobile 100 dB

A loud rock concert, sandblasting, auto horn 115 dB

A gun muzzle blast, jet engine 149 dB