EDITORIAL: Rebuilding the lakefront

It will take time to complete the cleanup and repair work along the water

It has been a devastating year as flood waters this spring left a wake of damages along Summerland’s waterfront.

The flooding has now subsided and the lake is down to full pool capacity, but the damages are clearly visible. Docks have been destroyed, concrete along the walking path is eroding, benches and park equipment may be unstable after the water affected their foundations.

In addition, crews will also be needed to remove the thousands of sandbags which were set up to protect waterfront properties in Trout Creek and the Lowertown area during the worst of the flooding.

These sandbags cannot simply be left in place, and already some of the sandbags are deteriorating.

Funding for this clean up work is available through the provincial government’s Disaster Financial Assistance program, and the municipality has already sent in an application. This funding will cover 100 per cent of the costs of cleanup and repair.

While this funding is needed, the money is not the only factor to consider.

It will also take time to complete the cleanup and repair work along the water.

Work is expected to begin this fall, but the details of the cleanup timeline are not yet known.

While there are many important projects for Summerland, the waterfront cleanup and restoration should be seen as a priority for the community.

The waterfront is one of the Summerland’s best-love features. Residents use the beaches and walking paths throughout the year, and during the summer tourist season, visitors spend considerable time at the water.

It is essential that the waterfront area is well-maintained and attractive for those who are visiting Summerland.

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